24 Apr 2013

A - Z Challenge - U



The reflection of British wildflowers in emotions.
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Urtica urens. Unaware.

Like the larger Common Stinging Nettle, the toothed leaves of this smaller plant Urtica are covered with stinging hairs. The small unisexual flowers are crowded into numerous clusters in the axis of the leaves. Pale green, bristly and stinging, the flowers have no petals. The Small Nettle grows in wasteland.

Unaware of the prickles, the passer-by soon learns to their cost how the nettle stings and throbs. Caveat emptor, an old Latin phrase meaning let the buyer beware—a warning that notifies a buyer that the goods he or she is buying are subject to all defects, seen or unseen. Be ready to think quickly in a situation and react to things that you are not expecting to encounter. Like a Samurai, spring around to face the threat with sword drawn. Like a woman walking alone at night on a deserted street, be ready to knock on the nearest door if a stalker is following you. Like a footballer, be ready to grab the ball and run to victory. By being unaware, you could get stung, physically, mentally, or financially. 

Rudyard Kipling quote: “If you can keep your wits about you while all others are losing theirs, and blaming you. . . . The world will be yours and everything in it, what's more, you'll be a man, my son.”


Proverb: They that sow the wind, shall reap the whirlwind.

23 comments:

  1. Snap! I used Urtica too but featured the common stinging nettle.

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    1. Great writers sometimes stumble across the same subject at the same time. Perhaps they're spurred by thoughts from the Universal Consciousness. ;-)

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  2. Beautiful Francene thank you! Beware getting stung when unaware, so cleverly woven with the urtica urens. Awareness is all, as is being alert. Lovely post thank you again and the quotes are excellent.


    Susan Scott's Soul Stuff

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    1. Your appreciation makes my effort wothwhile, Susan.

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  3. A nasty plant - I remember being stung badly by stinging nettles so I wouldn't want to come across this plant.

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  4. I've come to visit you - through Buttercup - Golly I'm glad she recommended you. Super Post - and - your quotes are PERFECT for me today.
    -g-

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    1. So glad providence, or Buttercup, sent you my way.

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  5. Wow, for being a pretty plant it sure packs a nasty punch! It's always good to be aware when meandering through the wildflowers I guess! Happy A-to-Z 2013! ~Angela, Whole Foods Living, http://www.wholefoodsliving.blogspot.com/

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    1. It packs a stinging punch, that's for sure. Some grow either side of a public pathway between fields close to us. They almost meet in the height of summer. You have to walk carefully.

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  6. Thanks for stopping by and posting on my blog, have a good day.

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  7. Great quote! I'm not so sure I'd want that plant in my garden however!!

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    1. The plant is to be avoided, although I believe the roots lock nutrients into the soil.

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  8. Oooh, I love that poem, "If." I hate stinging plants by the way. But I remember when I was younger, we used to throw these plants at each other to see who could make them stick on clothes.

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    1. Haha. I've never heard of a dangerous game like that.

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  9. I'm so glad I discovered your Blog! Great theme. Thanks for visiting mine.

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  10. wicked plant. Then again, in Texas - like visiting Ray's aunt - there are cactus needles,etc that seem to attack like a porcupine - even as you walk by unaware.
    Great post.

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    1. Cactus needles are far worse. I guess Texans stay well away from their reach.

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  11. I guess God must have given the stinging quality to preserve the flowers.

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    1. I'm sure everything in nature has a purpose.

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  12. Stopping by for AtoZ. I've been caught off guard by nettles before, they're nasty plants.

    http://www.emilymoir.blogspot.com

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  13. Enjoyed your post and the way you have linked it with the proverb. Good Luck!

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  14. After living in this country forEVER, I just discovered The Nettle. Wrapping my hand around the little bugger I tugged. Ouch! The American nettle is quite pretty, though it bears no flowers and it makes a good tea. So I hear. I'm not going to harvest any don't feel like wearing gloves, besides, it's just not a friendly plant if you know what I mean. Ta for the visit to my blog.

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