26 Apr 2013

A - Z Challenge - W



The reflection of British wildflowers in emotions.
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Watercress Rorippa. Wise  woman.

The perennial watercress Rorippa Amphibian grows on the margins of lakes and streams. A conspicuous terminal raceme of golden-yellow flowers rises from the centre of the rosette of leaves. The peppery taste of the cultivated watercress livens up salads and can be used as a garnish. Watercress is rich in Vitamin A and C, and a variety of nutrients. The leaves have been used for bladder and kidney problems.

Throughout the ancient and medieval periods, poor people in Europe turned to polar healers. The so-called wise woman possessed knowledge, passed down through generations, of traditional or folk medicine. She dealt with all kinds of illnesses and conditions, including childbirth and, in some cases, abortion. Her knowledge and skills were by not restricted to women’s health. Methods of diagnosis and treatment were based on the belief that all human life was linked to the rest of creation. Wise women used many practical herbal remedies, drawing on plants and the rest of the natural environment, which they knew well.

Their cures were often scoffed at. However, more recently the herbal remedies of folk medicine have been found to include many naturally occurring ingredients that are medically useful. Modern homeopothy has developed into a prominent branch of alternative medicine.


Proverb: To every thing there is a season.

16 comments:

  1. Many of the ancient herbal medicines are now being rediscovered and put to use in modern medicine.
    Informative post.
    Thanks for visiting my blog today :)

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    1. You can't beat plants. However, I always wonder who was the first guinea pig.

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  2. Someone else posted on watercress today! I wish there were more of those "wise women" around today. I prefer natural remedies to medicine any day!
    tm

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    1. Look. Over here. I'm a wise woman. Or do I mean old?

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  3. I've seen cultivated watercress growing but didn't realise they had yellow flowers.

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    1. My writing brings up the yellow color even more.

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  4. Plants as medicine -- I believe it possible. My mother uses herbs of all kind either for tea, sores or cuts.
    Great post, Francene.

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    1. We drink peppermint tea after our evening meal. It calms the stomach.

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  5. That wildflower looks beautiful and the color of our dreaded American ragweed!

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  6. What a beautiful blog. Inspirational, as well as informative. Thank you for sharing.

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  7. I was thinking of the children's book Strega Nona by Tomie dePaola. My children love that series, and the main character acts pretty much as the Wise Woman in your post.

    Very interesting, I appreciate alternative medicine for what it can do.

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  8. I didn't know watercress came with yellow flowers either. I believe I've had Chinese soup with watercress in it.

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    1. We eat watercress as a salad or use it in a plate decoration here in England.

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  9. Hi Francene .. I love watercress - just love the taste of it ... watercress sandwiches we had as children ... plain bread and butter, watercress, salt and pepper ... delicious memories!

    Cheers Hilary

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  10. Hi Francene, I've just discovered watercress. It is lovely with a green salad and a lemon juice dressing. I'm going to try to grow it in a waterfeature I have planned for the grove. I love the yellow flowers.

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